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Paintings, sketches, tutorials, videos, and art related DIY projects.

How to Export Models from Regard3D with Textures

If you saw my previous post/video about scanning objects into 3d models you'll know the current version of the program I used, Regard3D, has a bug with exporting objects with image textures.

The developer is aware of it and it should get fixed eventually, but in the meantime, a viewer sent me an email with a better workaround so I thought I'd go over it.

In the video I mentioned one way to get around it, and that is to use colored vertices, but as was pointed out to me, this creates much fuzzier textures at equal resolutions whereas an image texture will retain it's detail no matter the resolution of the model. I personally did not care about them so I didn't really investigate further, but the solution is embarrassingly simple if I would have thought about it more than two seconds.

We know the program saves everything as it creates it to the project directory and it can correctly make and read textured models from there so the files in the project folder must be fine, the bug occurs only when a model is exported.

Steps

So what we can do is once we created our surface model with image textures (Colorization Type should say Textures), instead of exporting it, note down it's path in our project tree. For the picture set, just count which it is from 0.

Project%20Tree%20in%20Regard%203D

Then open up the project folder in your computer and navigate to the path (e.g. Project Folder > pictureset_1 > matching_0 > triangulation_0 > densification_1 > surface_0). Once there you'll see a bunch of files. We need the obj file (our model), the mtl or material library file (tells programs where to look for the textures), and the texture images. Copy them manually wherever you wanted to export them to.

Project%20Tree%20in%20Regard%203D

Now we can import these into Blender (make sure your import extension for obj files is on) and they should work import automatically. If the textures aren't showing up just make sure you're using the Blender render engine and that you're in the texture view. This is how Blender imports them by default. To use them with a different rendering engine you'll have to connect the textures manually.

Pros & Cons

Colored Vertices Image Textures
Fuzzy Textures Detailed Textures
Smaller File Size at Same Detail Much Larger but...
Looks Much Worse at Low Resolutions* Same Texture Detail at Low Resolutions*
Computes Faster (2x +) Computes Slower (but again ^)
Duller/Less Reflective Captures more lighting artifacts.**

*This is because with colored vertices the amount of detail is tied to the amount of points, whereas with image textures, the texture is always the same resolution so it preserves it's details no matter the mesh's resolution.

This is why in the image below, even though we're at the same mesh resolution, the colored vertices make the texture look fuzzy.

Both%20at%20Depth%208

**By less reflective I mean that you don't get a lot of weird really light areas, especially if you had uneven lighting or scanned the model by turning it instead of turning the camera around the model. This causes lighting artifacts which are more noticeable when using image textures. I'm not 100% sure why that is, but it means using colored vertices might still be the better option if you don't care about the textures of your objects, just the color, and you want the scan to process faster.

For example, if you were scanning a smooth multi-colored toy, you'd need to add texture to it somehow like I did with this model by spraying it with ink. So you'd have to paint the model by hand anyways if you wanted textures, so you'd only really need a rough reference of the object's colors, image textures would be overkill.

Anyways, here are some more examples for comparison.

And here are some closeups, you can see how much detail the second one appears to hold even though the mesh is quite simple. If you have a keen eye you'll notice the textures aren't 100% the same, that's just because the program pieces them together slightly different at the different resolutions, but you can see the amount of detail is the same.

Other Notes

For those who might be wondering if it's possible to salvage the exported raw file, I did think it might be a simple bug, maybe an extra line or symbol or something that could be corrected by just editing the raw file, but the file is missing a lot of coordinates. Still I can open it in Meshlab and all the points are there, so if for some reason you lost all the files by this one, you could use the points to do the poisson surface reconstruction from there, though of course, you wouldn't be able to salvage the textures.

Thumbnail for Teapot - Quick Oil Study

Reference from mourguefile

Thumbnail for Beach - Quick Color Study

Reference (used under CC-BY license: Aquarelle marine 3 by E. D'Ascoli Photographies

How to Turn/Scan Objects Into 3D Models With Just a Camera

In this video I'll be showing you how you can turn almost any object into a 3D model with just your camera and some free software.

Now I'm not an expert at any of this. I've tried as best as possible to read through all the documentation, at least the parts I understand, and condense that into a video.

Also please note the cleanup process was aimed at getting it ready for sculpting. I know that people like to scan objects to then 3d print them, but I don't have a 3d printer, so you'll have to look somewhere else for the details on how to do that properly.

Lastly, I would love to share the project file so you can see what I tested but it's HUGE (15GB) and I'm not sharing the 3d model just yet because it's an original character of mine so I'm working on a generic version for practicing lighting the face, and I'll make that available to patreons when I finish it.

Regard3d + Tutorial/Documentation

Meshlab (I was using 1.3.4BETA)

Blender

If your object is particularly small I recommend you look at this part of the tutorial I wrote on magic lantern (you don't need it to apply the concepts descriped but it's helpful if you have an DSLR camera).

PS: To give you an idea of the type how long it might take on your computer, or what type of computer you need, I'm using a laptop with an Intel i5, 8GB of RAM, and a NVIDIA 650M GPU.

Polymer Clay Basics Part III

This is the third and last part of the polymer clay basics tutorial. I will be covering the different tools I use, blending clay, and doing some real time demonstrations. Because so much of this part is visual I won't be transcribing it to a post.

Polymer Clay Basics - Part II

This is part two of the polymer clay basics tutorial. See Part I here.

Armatures

My first tip is to use a sturdy bulked out armature that's a attached or can be easily attached to some sort of base. You do not want to try sculpting anything complex without an armature because you'll never find a place to grip it without ruining a different part.

For a figure you can run the main wires through the base of a piece of wood like this.

And on the top and bottom I used a special 2 part epoxy clay to secure it, more on that in a bit.

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Polymer Clay Softening Experiments

This is an extension of Polymer Clay Basics - Part I.

First & Second Test

I initially did a few rough experiments myself though with different substances. I only thought of a few things I had on hand (not baby oil), then I redid part of the test with the baby oil but I didn't bake it exactly the same (the first test you see in the pictures was slightly overcooked). So it was a bit of a mess but it told me that in a pinch you could use just about anything. At normal cooking temperatures there was very little difference in coloration. There were some differences in flexibility but Fimo is so flexible no piece broke from the bending.

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Polymer Clay Basics - Part I

So since I read the Imaginative Realism book that I reviewed I started on a head sculpt to have as reference. I had been working on a 3d model of a head before that, but it's not done yet. I thought I'd take the chance to get back into sculpting, plus it's faster than 3d modeling for me still and it's always nice to have something physical. I don't have a 3d printer, so I can't print any 3d models I make, but it's possible to turn a sculpt like this into a 3d model with just a camera and the right software.

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Thumbnail for Head Sculpt Timelapse

Head Sculpt Timelapse

So this was just a test recording to see how well I could record me sculpting and it didn't turn out too well but I didn't want to just delete all this footage and the video I had planned got delayed for various reasons so I thought I'd post this anyway.

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Quick Tip - How to Tighten Tripod Legs

I didn't finish the video I really wanted to do (on sculpting with polymer clay) so this is just a quick tip. It won't work for all tripods, but it should work for most of the ones that use hinges to tighten the legs.

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